Crops of the future
Research Subject

STAY CURIOUS: New genetic variants of plants are more tolerant to cold, heat, and drought which enables them to produce higher crop yields. Research director Birgitte Skadhauge conducts research into ancient plants, which can lead the way to better and more sustainable crops.

Robot philosophy
Research Subject

STAY CURIOUS: Robot philosophy is about social robots, which are autonomous and designed to interact with people and other robots. Professor Johanna Seibt examines what robots do to people, and what we can and cannot use them for.

Global problems require global solutions
Research Subject

STAY CURIOUS: International courts are politically and legally important and contribute by holding states to their obligations. Professor Mikael Rask Madsen examines cause and effect of the rising number of international courts all over the world.

Digital diplomacy
Research Subject

STAY CURIOUS: Today, diplomacy does not only take place behind closed doors, but can be followed by everyone on social media. What earlier took a long time in conference rooms, will now happen in an instant on Twitter. Professor Rebecca Adler-Nissen conducts research into what happens when foreign policies unfold in the digital age.

Palmyra and the social media of the Antiquity
Research Subject

STAY CURIOUS: The city ruin of Palmyra is an important archeological area, which has been home to settlements for millennia and played a pivotal role in the infrastructure of the Roman empire. Professor Rubina Raja studies Palmyrene funerary portraits and what they reveal about the past and present.

On the verge of life
Research Subject

STAY CURIOUS: What does it mean to be human? Mette Nordahl Svendsen examines “liminal” life, which means existence on the border of life and death, person and non-person. These borders are not naturally given but generated through social practice and cultural conditioning.

Climate change impacts life under the sea
Research Subject

STAY CURIOUS: The composition of plankton in the oceans is changing as a consequence of global warming. Professor Thomas Kiørboe examines eco-systems and live organisms in the ocean, which generally move towards the poles to remain in the temperatures in which they are used to exist.

On rewilding nature
Research Subject

STAY CURIOUS: The concept of “rewilding” covers the endeavours to lessen human impact on natural ecosystems and restoring natural processes. Professor Jens Christian Svenning’s research revolves around how to reinstate animal populations to restore their function in the food chain, hence increasing biodiversity.

A planet under pressure
Research Subject

STAY CURIOUS: The Anthropocene is the age of mankind and is characterized by the significant changes we see all over the world as a result of our use of, and effect on the geology and eco-system of Planet Earth. Anthropologist Kirsten Hastrup explores the changes in Greenland where they are very obvious.

Matter and antimatter - two sides of the same coin
Research Subject

STAY CURIOUS: You, I, and everything else in the Universe is made out of matter. But there should be antimatter, equivalent to the total volume of matter in the Universe. The question, however, is this: Where did the antimatter go? Meet professor and physicist, Jeffrey S. Hangst, who is on the hunt for the antimatter that disappeared.

From microscopic to an entire universe
Research Subject

STAY CURIOUS: Galaxies have not always existed. The have emerged through the course of the history of the Universe. Galaxies consist of a type of dark matter condensate and gas. So, does Professor Johan Fynbo believe, that there is life on other planets? Anything else would be peculiar.

Should we fear or embrace artificial intelligence?
Research Subject

STAY CURIOUS: Professor of physics Jacob Friis Sherson does research into hybrid intelligence to figure out what humans and computers, respectively, do better. How we react to artificial intelligence will, in part, define our future. We can fear it or embrace it.