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Constructive Journalism: Precedents, Principles, and Practices

Carlsberg Foundation Monograph Fellowships

What

This monograph will become the central, research-based publication when it comes to understanding the guiding principles and practices for a journalism that aims to do more than simple inform about problems. Under names, such as constructive journalism, solutions journalism, positive journalism and engaging journalism, journalists, editors and media owners all over the world have in the last few years experimented with new types of journalism that promotes or even help implement solutions to societal problems. In essence, this book will ensure that development of the field of journalism will not be halted, hampered, or downright hindered by lack of knowledge and common understanding.

Why

While journalists, editors, and media owners all over the world have started experimenting with new, constructive approaches to journalism too little actual research has been made, so far. This have left room for free interpretation, many subsequent misunderstandings and now even supporters are debating among themselves. Researchers - and as such journalists and editors - therefore still grapple with questions relating to the actual principles, precedents, and practices of constructive journalism, including the effects of constructive journalism. This monography will help answer these questions by becoming the central research-based publication when it comes to understanding the guiding principles and practices for a journalism that aims to do more than simply inform about problems.

How

This book will collect all knowledge - review all the most important experiments and research projects from around the world - and based on this work about the potentials as well as the problems with this development within journalism, the monograph will introduce new vantage points and adjacent concepts for what it means to work constructively.

SSR

This monograph will have a major impact among journalism researchers, but also in classrooms and newsrooms and as such improve how people outside the news media gets societal information, partake in public communication and democracy.